Posts Tagged ‘ratebeer.com’

For the first time in my 26 years of beer hunting I have been able to sample more than 1’000 (1007 exactly) new beers in one year. Those of you who think this is a pretty incredible accomplishment should know that the top 2 raters on ratebeer.com scored more than 4’500 new beers in 2013. One really has to think twice about it, as it represents more than 12 new beers in average per day ! Mind-boggling … And don’t think I am on top in Switzerland either: notorious beer ticker Thomas Schneider has tracked down more than 2’000 beers last year.

Every year I am saying to myself that I will not be able to keep that pace, yet manage somehow to taste more every time. So I won’t say anything this time …Just live and let drink !

source_2013

Origins of the beers tasted in 2013

First comment: yes, I’m a good sponsor of Erzbierschof …If I have given this already legendary establishment an own category, it is not only because it could fit in more than one (bar, beer shop and online beer shop) but mainly to show its importance. The second most important category are trades with 18%. Back in 2009 trades were accounting for as much as 32% (see also http://www.bov.ch/beer/faq.html for more comparison) but I am keeping it down now to about 5 different sources, the kings from this category being the Swedish beer rater Per Forsgren and the Swiss beertickers Philipp Sigg and Thomas Schneider.

Close behind trades the next source are festivals. Here again, a huge difference in comparison with 2009, this time in the other direction. I am always saying I am not a big fan of festivals because of the pretty hard conditions for tasting beers there but it doesn’t mean I try to avoid them. And 2013 was – for me – decently rich in that matter with the Mondial de la Bière (Mulhouse; 69 beers), the Copenhagen Beer Festival (44), the Solothurner Biertage (39) and the Unterländer Biertage (22).

11% of the beers I had last year were received from friends. So I really want to thank all of them here again, especially the undisputed king (or should I say bishop ?) of this category: Toni Flükiger. Particularly pleasant to notice is the constantly increasing number of beers I receive from brewers. Here also, many thanks to all of them, notably Patrik Feller and Tom Strickler.

The number of countries was almost the same as last year – 34 – with 2 new ones among them: Cayman Islands and San Marino. The most represented country has been – of course – Switzerland with 348 beers followed by the USA (150), Belgium (102), Denmark (69) and Sweden (44). Two countries are sharing first place of the favorites: Spain and New Zealand, no surprise if you consider both of them being regularly mentioned as fast emerging beer countries. From place 3 to 5 you can find Norway, the Netherlands (winner in 2012 and 2011) and the USA. Switzerland appears (only) in 15th position.

Interesting is to take a look at the alcohol average. While it is 6.5% in average, the Netherlands stay at one end of the scale with 9.2% followed by Norway and Scotland (both 8.5%) while on the other end the Czech Republic (4.7%) and Finland (5%) can be met. Switzerland remains pretty low with 5.8%. Here are the whole data:

Average alcohol content per country

Average alcohol content per country

 The most represented breweries last year – for a total of 413 different ones – have been De Proef with 71 beers (thanks to the Danish gypsy brewers !), De Molen (26) and Storm&Anchor (23). The first two are the same as in 2012. Other noteworthy presences of Swiss breweries include Strättligen Bier (13), Birrificio Ticinese (10) and UHB (9).

My favorite brewery of 2013 with a minimum of 3 beers tasted is Fanø (already 2nd the year before). Then follow Storm&Anchor (3rd in 2012), Cantillon and Clown Shoes tied for 3rd and Bevog, Anchorage and Elav tied for 5th.

lFanoLogoFor the third consecutive year the most represented style has been IPA and this by far (112 beers) ! Then come “Spice/Herb/Vegetable” (52), Imperial Stout (46), American Pale Ale (39) and Fruit Beer (35). The days of the overwhelming presence of blond lagers are over ! Even when counting Pale Lager, Premium Lager, Pilsner and Dortmunder/Helles altogether, it makes 82 so clearly behind the 112 IPAs where neither Black IPA (15) nor Double IPA (29) are included.

This brings me to the next point: my favorite styles of 2013. Despite liking subtle and delicate beers (trust me, I’m not joking !) I like it rough – like Lady Gaga – most of the time. So it comes as no surprise to see Imperial Stout as a clear number 1. The followers are Double IPA, American Strong Ale, Fruit Lambic and Baltic Porter. At the bottom of this list you will find Malt Liquor (worst), Pale Lager, Zwickelbier, English Pale Ale and Dunkelweizen. I continue to be surprised – like last year – to see English Pale Ale so badly rated by myself.

I will now take a closer look at Switzerland.

BlackwellBreweryI have discovered beers from 30 new breweries last year (there were 20 in 2012) and the title of best new brewery of 2013 goes to the highly creative Blackwell (Burgdorf). Second is the excellent Brasserie des 5 Quatre Mille (Zinal) and third the classical yet very good Burg-Bier (Ringgenberg). Here some other very good breweries worth to mention: Wagerswiler Bräu (Wagerswil), Bodensee (Egnach), Sennbräu (Buchs, SG), Doppelleu (Winterthur), Montheysanne (Monthey) and Mein Teil (Bolligen). As I not always can be kind, I would like to point out some breweries which are clearly under the waterline: Burggütli-Bräu (Schaffhausen), Meiga-Bräu (Wangen) and Trio (Les Monts-de-Pully).

But the qualities of the best newcomers have not been enough to reach the top five of the best Swiss breweries of 2013. The fifth place goes to Officina della Birra (which was 2nd in 2012), fourth is the always improving and now highly qualitative Stozi-Bräu, third is the Brasserie des Cieux (Alas! If only Dominique would brew more often !) and second place is taken by the legendary BFM. And finally, after all the positive things I have written about them last year, it would be highly surprising not to see them on top … All my congratulations go to the amazing Storm&Anchor, my best Swiss brewery of 2013. I am waiting impatiently to discover all the new wizardries of Tom in 2014 !

storm_anchor_2013Again: no surprises to see the same protagonists while talking about the best Swiss beers of 2013. Storm&Anchor Burned wins (and is also overall best beer of 2013 !) ahead of BFM Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien 2012 and Storm&Anchor Black (both ranked 5th overall).

Finally, here are the other international beers which made it to my top ten of 2013:

Fanø Evil Twin Even More Jesus (2nd), Renaissance 8 Wired iStout and Westbrook Mexican Cake Imperial Stout (tied for 3rd place) and Amager the Sinner Series Pride, Mont Salève la Tzarine, Croce di Malto Piedi NeriLervig Mikkeller George ! Barrel Aged Calvados Edition and Jester King Funk Metal (all tied for 5th). Doesn’t this look good ?

Is everything said ? I hope so.

Cheers everyone and have a good 2014 beer year !

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Once in a while (pretty rarely indeed…) I just don’t have enough motivation to rate beers and I only would like to sit back and enjoy the content of my glass. That is the major difference between a beerticker , who can just drink a beer and tick it, and a beer rater, who wants/needs to evaluate the brew and write a review. Well, it is my problem and I’m the only one to blame, mind you … Anyway,  I usually try to get advantage of such periods by “cleaning” my cellar and drinking duplicate and vintage beers.

First of all, a little introduction on vintage beers.

Some 15 years ago, I got pretty excited on aging beers and started to store a lot of different bottles in my cellar. I even wrote a dedicated page, which I still periodically update every time I can sample old beers. To be honest, my initial enthusiasm has been tempered since then. If it surely can be funny and interesting to see how each beer style is evolving during the years, it is not something I consider worth such time and effort anymore. There are definitely too few beers which will reward you at the end, so be sure of what you want to keep jealously in your cellar before starting with anything.

As I just had such a “rating-depression” period which lasted exceptionally long ( in fact the first half of November), I would like to share with you some of my impressions about the beers I had during these 16 days.

cap of a Westvleteren 12 from 1999

The Lancelot XI.I, a solid barley wine showing 11.1% alcohol, is perfectly able to resist some years of aging. My last two bottles, from 2005 and 2006, offer a pretty enjoyable beer which failed however to evolve and still, like younger samples, lacks of complexity.

The Belzebuth has been first brewed by the brewery Jeanne d’Arc at an impressive 15% alcohol content. Although being top-fermented, this beer shows indeed more characteristics of a malt liquor than of a Belgian strong ale. Taken over by the Brasseurs de Gayant in 2001, the brewery soon changed its name to Grain d’Orge and dropped down the alcohol content of the Belzebuth at 13%. Nowadays, you can even find versions of it at 11.8% and 8.8%. The 2004 version I just had remained quite respectable.

The Trappists:

Trappist beers are classical candidates for cellaring. For those of you who wish to know a bit more on Trappists, you can read my Trappist beer page or, for more in-depth knowledge, the excellent book of Jef van den Steen, Trappist – Het Bier en de Monniken (does also exist in french but I am not sure about an english version).

I am one of those people who think the beer of Chimay have changed somewhere during the mid-nineties. Since then, they definitely fail to enthusiasm me. The three beers I just had –Blanche 1999 and 2000 and  Rouge 2000 – were pretty dubious or at best quite tasteless. The Bleue (or Grande Réserve) is reputed to age better than her two sisters, so I will tell you more as soon as  my two bottles (2000 and 2002) will be uncorked.

The nice surprise came from the youngest of the Trappist breweries: Achelse Kluis. The three beers – Achel Blond 2001 and 2002 as well as Achel Bruin 2002 – were very tasty and enjoyable, showing no signs of weakness.

40 years old ?

As I’m a pretty big fan of the astringency of a fresh Orval, it is no surprise that I have not been really excited by the 2006 sample I had. Drink it fresh !

The beers La Trappe from the Dutch brewery of Koningshoeven (owned by Bavaria) are for me an even worse example than Chimay: they were definitely better in the nineties and nobody could convince me that nothing has changed in their recipes. Anyway, the sweet, oily and bubblegum-like Quadrupel 2000 has not altered my opinion.

Since the very beginning of my beer hunting “career”, I always had a soft spot for Rochefort, especially for the 10 which has been the leader of my ranking during many years. Many many beers came since then and, although I still consider the Rochefort to be very good beers, they are not on top anymore. I got mixed feelings from the aged ones I recently sampled. The two Rochefort 6 -both from 2006 – were uneven and quite dull. The Rochefort 8 from 2002 was on the contrary pretty inspiring. And what about the legendary 10 ? Here also some confusing conclusions: the 2006 was rather restrained while the 2001 still had pretty much strength and charisma. Would I have tried them blind, I would definitely have gone wrong in guessing the vintage.

Unfortunately, I had only one Westmalle, an excellent Tripel 2006. Give me more !

Since the RateBeer.com “Best Beer in the World” competition put it on top in 2004, there has been a constant hype around Westvleteren. Years before already, this brewery meant something special for the beer geeks around the world. The quality of course, but above all the rarity of their beers made them mythic. Here also, my recent tastings gave me different impressions. While older ones – an 8 version from 2000 and a 12 from 1999 – were fully satisfying, the other two, younger versions of the 12 from 2004 and 2005, failed to be really enjoyable. One more example showing that cellaring beers is an inexact science.

Other Belgian beers:

The impressions here have been quite positive. They went from “above average” for beers like De Dolle Oerbier 2003, Bush Blond 2000, Bush de Noël 2001, Duvel 2000 and 2006 to “beautiful” for Liefmans Goudenband 1999, Boon Kriek 2001 and Abbaye des Rocs Grand Cru 1999.

German beers:

Those of you who think Germany does not have a beer style suited for aging are wrong ! No, I did not had some 10 years old Weissbier or Lager Hell … But a Berliner Weisse from Landré brewed at Schultheiss. Berliner Weisse is generally low in alcohol and shows a sometimes very solid sourness and acidity due to a lactic fermentation. The beer I had was a gift from ratebeerian “Der Doppelbock” and, unfortunately, the age of the bottle, cannot be determined exactly. But it seems to be between 35 and 40 years old.  The beer remained fully drinkable and enjoyable with restrained sourish notes and subtle fruity tones. Impressive …

Swiss beers:

The two BFM Cuvée du 11ème I had (vintage 2008) were still more than respectable. The Cuvée du 9ème, an IPA brewed in 2006 by the same brewery, was even more than that. The hoppy character sure got more mellow but it looks like having now more depth and balance. I also had four or five BFM Alex le Rouge from 2007. This beer, for me the best Imperial Stout of the country, did not show any signs of weakness after 4 years of aging.

And finally, I have kept the best for the end, namely a Samichlaus 1996 from the defunct brewery Hürlimann. During the years, I have tasted this vintage at different ages: 5, 6, 7, 10 and 15 years old. I must admit that this beer never stops to amaze me: it seems immortal and its complexity is increasing while getting older. A beauty !

Those who know me know I’m a bit of a statistics freak. If a ranking list can be made or if a chart can be drawn, trust me: I’ll do it sooner or later.

So when I came upon a recent forum discussion on ratebeer.com, talking about the number of breweries in different countries, I jumped at the opportunity. Based on websites like beerme.com or ratebeer.com, as well as with the help of everyone’s friends Google and Wikipedia, it has been a pretty easy and quick task.
Please bear in mind that all the numbers below are constantly changing and that, despite all the information sources, a 100% accuracy remains impossible.

Let’s first take a look at the countries with the most breweries. Since a couple of years (somewhere between 2004 and 2008) the United States have taken the lead over the long-time leader Germany. Here’s the top ten:

country number of breweries source
USA 1759 Brewer Association
Germany 1332 German-Breweries.com
England 628 BBC News
China 500 Research and Markets
France 475 ratebeer.com / Biere France
Japan 406 ratebeer.com
Canada 391 ratebeer.com
Switzerland 335 Bov’s Beers
Italy 303 Mondo Birra
Australia 243 ratebeer.com

The presence of countries like Japan or Switzerland surely is a surprise to most of you. Some solid beer countries can be found just further: Austria (11th), Belgium (12th), the Czech Republic (15th) and Denmark (16th). It can be noticed that the overall number of breweries worldwide seems to be pretty close to 10’000 (see also the complete table at the end of this post)

Craft Brewers in the USA

What about the countries with the highest density of breweries per capita ?

This question raises a small definition problem: what counts exactly as a country ? ratebeer.com is pretty (too ?) generous in this aspect, so I have allowed myself to take the non self-governing territories out of this ranking. Here the ones which would have made it in the top-ten:

country number of breweries population population per brewery comment
Norfolk Island 1 1’828 1’828 Australia’s external territory
Cayman Islands 3 54’878 18’293 British overseas territory
Bermuda 2 64’566 32’283 British overseas territory
United States Virgin Islands 3 109’000 36’333 insular area of the USA
Turks and Caicos Islands 1 40’357 40’357 British overseas territory

This leaves us with the following top ten:

country number of breweries population population per brewery comment
Cook Islands 3 23’400 7’800 free association with New Zealand; self-governing
Liechtenstein 3 36’157 12’052  
Greenland 3 56’452 18’817 autonomous country within Kingdom of Denmark
Palau 1 20’000 20’000  
Switzerland 335 7’866’500 23’482  
Faroe Islands 2 48’596 24’298  
Isle of Man 3 83’000 27’667 self-governing British dependency
Monaco 1 35’000 35’000  
Iceland 9 318’452 35’384  
Denmark 135 5’564’219 41’216  

Some strange and very small countries, isn’t it ? 😉

Following the advice allegedly attributed to Sir Winston Churchill, “Only trust statistics you’ve manipulated yourself“, I suggest to present a more serious top ten by skipping countries having less than 5 active breweries. This gives us the following ranking:

country number of breweries population population per brewery
Switzerland 335 7’866’500 23’482
Iceland 9 318’452 35’384
Denmark 135 5’564’219 41’216
Wales 72 2’999’300 41’657
Austria 192 8’404’252 43’772
New Zealand 87 4’408’900 50’677
Belgium 189 11’007’020 58’238
Slovenia 35 2’052’120 58’632
Germany 1332 81’802’000 61’413
Luxembourg 8 502’100 62’763

Now you know why it’s great to be a swiss beerhunter 😉

Finally, here is the complete table, enjoy!

country number of breweries population population per brewery
Afghanistan 0 31’412’000 N/A
Albania 7 3’195’000 456’429
Algeria 5 36’300’000 7’260’000
Andorra 0 84’082 N/A
Angola 3 19’082’000 6’360’667
Antigua & Barbuda 1 89’000 89’000
Argentina 158 40’091’359 253’743
Armenia 4 3’263’600 815’900
Aruba 1 107’000 107’000
Australia 243 22’642’901 93’181
Austria 192 8’404’252 43’772
Azerbaijan 2 8’997’400 4’498’700
Bahamas 3 353’658 117’886
Bahrain 0 1’262’000 N/A
Bangladesh 1 150’776’000 150’776’000
Barbados 1 273’000 273’000
Belarus 9 9’481’100 1’053’456
Belgium 189 11’007’020 58’238
Belize 1 333’200 333’200
Benin 2 8’778’646 4’389’323
Bermuda 2 64’566 32’283
Bhutan 2 695’822 347’911
Bolivia 11 10’426’154 947’832
Bosnia 9 3’843’126 427’014
Botswana 2 1’800’098 900’049
Brazil 106 190’732’694 1’799’365
Brunei 0 399’000 N/A
Bulgaria 13 7’351’234 565’480
Burkina Faso 1 15’730’977 15’730’977
Burundi 1 8’383’000 8’383’000
Cambodia 6 13’395’682 2’232’614
Cameroon 1 19’406’100 19’406’100
Canada 391 34’492’000 88’215
Cape Verde Islands 1 491’575 491’575
Cayman Islands 3 54’878 18’293
Central African Republic 1 4’401’000 4’401’000
Ceuta 1 75’276 75’276
Chad 1 11’227’000 11’227’000
Chile 55 17’244’900 313’544
China 500 1’339’724’852 2’679’450
Colombia 20 46’034’000 2’301’700
Comoros 0 735’000 N/A
Congo 1 4’043’000 4’043’000
Cook Islands 3 23’400 7’800
Costa Rica 5 4’563’538 912’708
Croatia 26 4’425’747 170’221
Cuba 5 11’241’161 2’248’232
Curaçao 1 142’180 142’180
Cyprus 4 803’147 200’787
Czech Republic 153 10’535’811 68’862
Dem Rep of Congo 3 65’966’000 21’988’667
Denmark 135 5’564’219 41’216
Djibouti 0 889’000 N/A
Dominica 1 68’000 68’000
Dominican Republic 2 9’378’818 4’689’409
East Timor 1 1’124’000 1’124’000
Ecuador 3 14’306’876 4’768’959
Egypt 2 80’418’000 40’209’000
El Salvador 1 6’193’000 6’193’000
England 628 51’446’000 81’920
Equatorial Guinea 1 700’000 700’000
Eritrea 2 5’234’000 2’617’000
Estonia 9 1’340’122 148’902
Ethiopia 7 79’455’634 11’350’805
Falkland Islands 0 3’000 N/A
Faroe Islands 2 48’596 24’298
Fiji Islands 3 861’000 287’000
Finland 44 5’385’620 122’400
France 475 65’000’000 136’842
French Polynesia 1 266’952 266’952
Gabon 1 1’505’000 1’505’000
Gambia 1 1’728’000 1’728’000
Georgia 7 4’436’400 633’771
Germany 1332 81’802’000 61’413
Ghana 3 24’233’431 8’077’810
Greece 17 11’306’183 665’070
Greenland 3 56’452 18’817
Grenada 1 104’000 104’000
Guadeloupe 2 405’500 202’750
Guam 2 180’000 90’000
Guatemala 3 14’361’666 4’787’222
Guernsey 1 62’431 62’431
Guinea 1 9’982’000 9’982’000
Guinea-Bissau 1 1’515’000 1’515’000
Guyana 1 784’894 784’894
Haiti 1 10’085’214 10’085’214
Honduras 2 8’215’313 4’107’657
Hong Kong 3 7’061’200 2’353’733
Hungary 50 10’014’324 200’286
Iceland 9 318’452 35’384
India 31 1’210’193’422 39’038’497
Indonesia 4 237’556’363 59’389’091
Iran 3 75’405’000 25’135’000
Iraq 1 31’672’000 31’672’000
Ireland 32 4’470’700 139’709
Isle of Man 3 83’000 27’667
Israel 18 7’740’900 430’050
Italy 303 60’626’442 200’087
Ivory Coast 1 19’738’000 19’738’000
Jamaica 2 2’741’100 1’370’550
Japan 406 127’950’000 315’148
Jersey 1 92’500 92’500
Jordan 2 6’187’000 3’093’500
Kazakhstan 8 16’158’000 2’019’750
Kenya 4 38’610’097 9’652’524
Kiribati Republic 0 100’000 N/A
Kosovo 2 1’800’000 900’000
Kuwait 0 2’737’000 N/A
Kyrgyz Republic 8 5’418’300 677’288
Laos 4 6’230’200 1’557’550
Latvia 18 2’221’100 123’394
Lebanon 4 4’228’000 1’057’000
Lesotho 1 2’171’000 2’171’000
Liberia 1 3’994’000 3’994’000
Libya 2 6’355’000 3’177’500
Liechtenstein 3 36’157 12’052
Lithuania 51 3’225’300 63’241
Luxembourg 8 502’100 62’763
Macau 1 556’800 556’800
Macedonia 4 2’052’722 513’181
Madagascar 1 20’714’000 20’714’000
Malawi 1 14’901’000 14’901’000
Malaysia 4 27’565’821 6’891’455
Maldives 0 317’280 N/A
Mali 1 14’517’176 14’517’176
Malta 3 416’333 138’778
Marshall Islands 0 54’305 N/A
Martinique 1 397’730 397’730
Mauritania 0 3’460’000 N/A
Mauritius 3 1’280’925 426’975
Mexico 44 112’336’538 2’553’103
Micronesia 1 102’264 102’264
Moldova 11 3’563’800 323’982
Monaco 1 35’000 35’000
Mongolia 4 2’808’900 702’225
Monserrat 0 5’879 N/A
Montenegro 2 625’266 312’633
Morocco 1 32’181’000 32’181’000
Mozambique 1 22’416’881 22’416’881
Myanmar 3 47’963’000 15’987’667
Namibia 1 2’283’000 2’283’000
Nauru 0 10’000 N/A
Nepal 5 28’584’975 5’716’995
Netherlands 129 16’677’100 129’280
New Caledonia 1 245’580 245’580
New Zealand 87 4’408’900 50’677
Nicaragua 1 5’788’000 5’788’000
Niger 1 15’203’822 15’203’822
Nigeria 6 158’423’000 26’403’833
Niue 0 1’500 N/A
Norfolk Island 1 1’828 1’828
North Korea 5 24’346’000 4’869’200
Northern Ireland 6 1’789’000 298’167
Norway 42 4’952’600 117’919
Oman 0 2’694’094 N/A
Pakistan 1 176’409’000 176’409’000
Palau 1 20’000 20’000
Palestine 1 3’935’249 3’935’249
Panama 4 3’405’813 851’453
Papua New Guinea 1 6’703’000 6’703’000
Paraguay 3 6’230’000 2’076’667
Peru 10 29’461’933 2’946’193
Philippines 3 94’013’200 31’337’733
Poland 83 38’186’860 460’083
Portugal 6 10’636’888 1’772’815
Puerto Rico 2 3’725’789 1’862’895
Qatar 0 1’696’563 N/A
Réunion 1 827’000 827’000
Romania 17 21’466’174 1’262’716
Russia 170 142’905’200 840’619
Rwanda 3 10’412’820 3’470’940
Samoa 1 187’032 187’032
San Marino 0 31’887 N/A
São Tomé & Principe 1 165’000 165’000
Saudi Arabia 3 27’136’977 9’045’659
Scotland 61 5’222’100 85’608
Senegal Republic 1 12’434’000 12’434’000
Serbia 16 7’306’677 456’667
Seychelles 1 86’525 86’525
Sierra Leone 1 5’868’000 5’868’000
Singapore 6 5’076’700 846’117
Sint Maarten 0 37’429 N/A
Slovak Republic 18 5’435’273 301’960
Slovenia 35 2’052’120 58’632
Solomon Islands 1 530’669 530’669
Somalia 0 9’331’000 N/A
South Africa 38 49’991’300 1’315’561
South Korea 23 48’988’833 2’129’949
Spain 81 46’148’605 569’736
Sri Lanka 4 21’105’000 5’276’250
St Kitts 1 52’000 52’000
St Lucia 2 166’526 83’263
St Vincent & The Grenadines 1 109’000 109’000
Sudan 1 43’552’000 43’552’000
Suriname 1 525’000 525’000
Swaziland 1 1’186’000 1’186’000
Sweden 57 9’433’875 165’507
Switzerland 335 7’866’500 23’482
Syria 2 21’105’000 10’552’500
Taiwan 9 23’174’528 2’574’948
Tajikistan 1 6’879’000 6’879’000
Tanzania 5 43’187’823 8’637’565
Thailand 15 67’041’000 4’469’400
Tibet 2 2’910’000 1’455’000
Togo 1 6’028’000 6’028’000
Tonga 1 104’000 104’000
Trinidad & Tobago 2 1’317’714 658’857
Tunisia 4 10’549’100 2’637’275
Turkey 10 73’722’988 7’372’299
Turkmenistan 2 5’042’000 2’521’000
Turks and Caicos Islands 1 40’357 40’357
Tuvalu 0 10’000 N/A
Tuvalu 0 10’000 N/A
Uganda 2 31’800’000 15’900’000
Ukraine 27 45’724’242 1’693’490
United Arab Emirates 2 8’264’070 4’132’035
United States Virgin Islands 3 109’000 36’333
Uruguay 9 3’356’584 372’954
USA 1759 311’603’000 177’148
Uzbekistan 13 27’445’000 2’111’154
Vanuatu 2 240’000 120’000
Vatican City 0 500 N/A
Venezuela 6 29’263’000 4’877’167
Vietnam 37 87’375’000 2’361’486
Wales 72 2’999’300 41’657
Yemen 0 22’492’035 N/A
Zambia 2 13’046’508 6’523’254
Zimbabwe 1 12’571’000 12’571’000
Total 9’107